BYOx device selection models

Five BYOx device selection models are recommended. ​A school can adapt any model to suit its own needs, ranging from highly regulated (model 1) to highly flexible (model 5):

Model 1: One specific school-selected device.

Model 2: One specific school-selected device, plus students can bring an additional device of their choice.

Model 3: A school-selected range of approved devices.

Model 4: Any device that meets school-determined minimum specifications.

Model 5: Students bring any device that can connect to the internet, suits their learning styles and meets their curriculum needs.

"BYOx device selection models"

 

The BYOx five selection models presentation (PPT, 7.8MB) (RTF, 97KB)​ features information on all five models.

Model 1: One specific school-selected device

Device constraints

All devices have the same operating system and software.

Positives

All devices have the same capabilities, which may aid:

  • planning for lessons, the curriculum and pedagogy
  • technical support
  • access to school network and information systems
  • virus protection
  • network management
  • licensing (compliance and upgrades).

Potential issues

  • Affordability and equity: what about families that can't afford the device?
  • Enforcement: what happens to students who do not have the device?
  • Portability: what happens when students move between BYOx schools?
  • Limits to choice and innovation.
  • On what basis is the decision made (learning vs cost)?
  • Should BYOx device decisions be made by school or families?

Model 2: One specific school-selected device, plus students can bring an additional device of their choice

Device constraints

School selected devices have the same operating system and software. There are no minimum specifications for supplementary devices.

Positives

In addition to the positives outlined in Model 1, this model also offers:

  • more choice for the parent/student
  • flexibility of use to match individual student requirements.

Potential issues

In addition to the issues outlined in Model 1, this model also raises the following issues:

  • a potential doubling of the devices on the network, raising bandwidth issues
  • unfiltered mobile internet access
  • additional devices may be a distraction if not embedded in curriculum delivery and teacher professional development
  • security, liability and insurance issues
  • equity issues: what about the students that don't have an additional device?
  • acceptable use and other policies may need updating.

Model 3: School-selected range of approved devices

Device constraints

Minimum size, software and capability specifications must be met.

Positives

  • Allows additional choice.
  • Some students may already have a suitable device.
  • Potentially allows students to work on a familiar platform.
  • Software licensing workload may be reduced.

Potential Issues

  • Equity, affordability and enforcement issues: what happens to students who don’t have or can’t afford proposed devices?
  • Network management may be more complex.
  • Do teachers and technicians need to be familiar with all selected platforms?
  • Lesson planning and pedagogy will need to cater for a range of platforms, software and apps.
  • Not all software types are available on all platforms.
  • Need to manage multiple vendors.
  • Acceptable use and other policies may need updating.

Model 4: Any device that meets school-determined minimum specifications

Device constraints

Minimum size, software, app and capability specifications must be met.

Positives

  • Allows additional choice.
  • Some students may already have a suitable device.
  • Potentially allows students to work on a familiar platform.

Potential issues

  • Not all devices will have the same capabilities: do lessons have to be planned around the lowest capability machine?
  • How is work assessed? Does it take into account ICT capabilities?
  • Equity, affordability and enforcement issues: what happens to students who don’t have or can’t afford any proposed device?
  • Network management may be more complex.
  • Do teachers and technicians need to be familiar with all platforms?
  • Licensing becomes a greater issue.
  • Security issues increase (including virus protection, inappropriate access, electrical safety, physical safety, insurance and liability).
  • Need to manage multiple vendors
  • Acceptable use and other policies may need updating.

Model 5: Students bring any device that can connect to the internet, suits their learning styles and meets their curriculum needs

Device constraints

Minimum software, app and capability specifications must be met.

Positives

  • Greatly enhanced choice.
  • More students are likely to already have a device.
  • Students work on a device they are familiar with that may match their preferred learning style.
  • Less technical support may be needed.

Potential issues

  • Greater range of devices may cause lesson planning and technical support issues.
  • Some devices may not suit planned lessons.
  • Pedagogical complexities increase with a greater range of devices.
  • Equity issues rise as the range of devices increases.
  • Do teachers and technicians need to be familiar with all platforms?
  • Licensing becomes a bigger issue.
  • Security issues increase (including virus protection, inappropriate access, electrical safety, physical safety, insurance and liability).
  • Need to manage multiple vendors.
  • Acceptable use and other policies may need updating.

References

Microsoft Bring Your Own Device in Schools whitepaper

BYOD: Embracing Technology in K-12 Schools by Jennifer Sicking, 12th November 2012

BYOD implementation will help students become more independent learners, Blog posts (various) 2012​​​​​​​​​​​

‘Teachers recognise BYOx will alleviate much of the daily work to manage distribution and return of school devices. The BYOx program will also support continuity of learning at home for those in the program. There are equity concerns and the potential negative impact on the luxury of guaranteed access for all students in all classes.’

James Nash State High School

Last updated
21 December 2016